Road Block

The name I’ve used for years for farm and now herbal stuff has been rejected by the state on a LLC filing. There is a group named Seasons of Change, Inc. and they say it is too close to Seasons of Change LLC. I just read the letter, and if I’m reading this right, any name with Seasons of Change in it is not viable. Not quite sure what to do. Everything has this name on it: hats, FB pages, blogs, etc. It took forever to pick a name to begin with. I could keep it and file under something else, change the name completely (new place, new name), or …something.  Thinking through my options.

 

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The Ball is Rolling

My Certified Naturally Grown application has been turned in and awaiting approval. My inspection is tentatively scheduled pending my new job’s work schedule (hello farm store discount!).

Sunflower, squash, tomato, and pea seeds have sprouted. Too bad I didn’t get the wood for the beds yet. Yikes. Not sure what I was thinking other than I can’t wait to get the plants going.

Anne’s possible birth window opens soon (previous owner didn’t keep track). The lamb will be retained. We still have to get a raptor-proof lambing jug up.

Chicken and turkey coop building will be right after so I can order chickens and turkeys. I’m not sure if we’ll stick with Bourbons. I may check the Livestock Conservancy and go with an endangered breed.

I’m looking at new marketing materials since most of mine were created for Maine.

Getting a storm shelter is high on the list after we had to sit through 30 pmh sustained winds with tornado watches a week ago.

We’re getting the ball rolling.

Oh yeah, and we actually have a domain now.

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Restarting

I’ve had to get a job, so any hours we have will be by appointment only once we get started again.  I’ve joined TOFGA, and we are looking at greenhouse ideas.  Strictly low budget.  I’m leaning towards a hoop house like we did with the shelters.

Ann adjusted fairly well to her new home, and Amy is happy as a clam.  She’s still skittish around me, but will come to me if Amy does.  However, she won’t let me touch her so I can’t feel for lamb movement.  I’ll have to get my son out to help me. We’re discussing going back and buying the other ewes she had for sale. The goats are still eating Amy’s wool, so a separate area is moving up the “must do” list.

Our neighbor put the land next to us up for sale.  This is the land we tried to buy, but he bought it first.  I’m hoping we can get a down payment together, and buy it when he drops the price in February.  It’s doubtful, but it won’t hurt to try.

We’re trying to decide how to lay out the chickens and turkeys in relation to the rest of the place.  We miss having our feathered friends and plan to replace them asap.  We’re okay on some eggs for now, but my soy-sensitive daughter is joining us in the spring, so we need them in place by then.

The goats keep escaping and getting into the neighbor’s pasture of cattle.  Not a good way to build relations.  We’ve put temporary fencing up to block the barbed wire that they army crawl under (seriously amusing to watch a 110 pound goat army crawl).  The adults haven’t gotten out again but the kids have.  We’re literally piling things in front of any suspected holes to block them. So far they’re winning.

Update

We arrived in Texas at the end of October.   We built temporary shelters for the sheep and goats, plus added a temporary shed to cover hay and other things we needed to store like grain bins and outdoor tools.   It has held up fairly well to the wind.   Rebuilding will be slow, getting utilities hooked up is a lot more expensive than expected, and I’ve already gotten a list started for the trailer on the next trip down to Texas.  Those still in Maine are doing well.

We’ll be building a chicken coop soon along with a run. A new sheep was exposed to a ram prior to purchase, so we may have our first birth starting in February.   The previous owner didn’t keep track, so it will be interesting. She was exposed October to December. We need to build a lambing jug with a protective overhang. There are a lot of hawks and owls around.  We’ve already had coyotoes up to the fence.  All the animals roam during the day but are locked up at night. Amy is glad to have company again.

The weather has sometimes rivaled Maine.  Snow is expected on Saturday with a low of 19. We’re not happy, but that’s the way life goes.  We’re hoping the tanks on the camper don’t freeze.  I’m wishing I brought my heated buckets, but without electricity they wouldn’t work anyhow.  That’s pretty much it for now.

Kidding Season is Over

Our kidding season has come to a close.  The final tally is 2 live bucks, 2 live does and one stillborn buck.  Unfortunately, both does have a patch of white on their heads.  Breed standards say the white cannot be over 1.5 inches in any direction. Theirs isn’t so they still conform to Oberhasli standards.

We were quite surprised when Jupiter, a first freshener, had twins without a sound.   I had  camera with sound focused on the birthing stall.  My first clue was when I heard the first kid crying.  Both of her kids were much tinier than any other Ober kid we’ve had.  The buck came out second, was in distress, and not breathing.  We worked with him, and he pulled through.  Jupiter turned out to be a great mom, and both kids are doing well.

All 4 kids will go up for sale.  A brother and sister are currently listed, the second set of twins will be listed next week.  The buckling in the second set is looking good for breeding.  His dam’s udder is looking very nice, and he is a deep bay color.  Hopefully, his color doesn’t change as he sheds his baby coat.   I will add a picture of the udder when I list him.

After Loki lost her buckling, she was crying constantly.  So she stole her sister’s kids.  Her sister doesn’t seem to mind, so the little piglets will nurse on one, then run over to the other one and nurse.  This works for me, because I haven’t gotten the milking area set up yet.

Loki’s buckling was taken to a university for a necropsy.  It showed a genetic mutation, but there seems to be no cause for it.   We investigated her line and find nothing to support a genetic abnormality.  She is not the product of intensive line breeding, which can cause this, so we’re not sure what happened.   Our vet says to not breed her again, but her specialty is more equine.  Another vet that is  goat savvy says sometimes it happens for no reason, and she wouldn’t hesitate to breed her again in the Fall.

After discussing it with several long-time breeders, we will try again.  We will bring in a Guernsey buck or AI straws, because we want to breed up to them, which will have completely different lines.  However, if it happens a second time, then she’s done.

 

 

River Conforms – Barely

River at 9 days old 4102016.jpg Continue reading